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Expired food and drugs found in multiple Trenton stores

By Vayne Ong
with Samuel Lee, Jeannie Regidor and the staff of The Princeton Summer Journal

In a Krauszer’s Food Store in Trenton, New Jersey, five two-liter bottles of Barq’s root beer collect dust on the bottom shelf of the soda aisle. When the dust is wiped away, text reveals these bottles all passed their sell-by dates in June 2014.

These were just five of the 272 expired products, ranging from food to over-the-counter drugs, found in an Aug. 4 Princeton Summer Journal investigation. In a survey of convenience stores and pharmacies in Trenton, a team of 23 Summer Journal reporters discovered a wide range of products that have passed their sell-by, best-if-used-by, use-by, and expiration dates. Continue reading

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University’s Arts ‘neighborhood’ draws community criticism

By Marlee Kelly
Pine Ridge, S.D.

With its brick, cottage-like building, surrounding foliage, and an outdoor shelter, the old Dinky station at Princeton University is like a scene from a fairytale book. The station has been a beloved landmark at Princeton University since its original construction in 1865. For the past hundred and fifty years, the Dinky has transported staff, students, and community members alike to and from the Princeton campus. The recent relocation of the station, however, has caused some ripples throughout the town.

Students and community members who rode the Dinky were skeptical about the relocation of the site and the “destruction of history” that the new station would bring. One group, Save the Dinky, has openly expressed their displeasure with the project. “The University has been saving the Dinky for a very long time,” University Vice President and Secretary Robert Durkee said in response. Continue reading

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Creation of Arts ‘neighborhood’ stir debate

By Jocelyn Molina
Roma, Tex.

Most of Princeton University looks as if it’s still stuck in the 1740s. Gothic Architecture. Creeping Ivy. Ghost tours. One would think it’s in dire need of modernization. Geometric foundations.  Minimalistic hues. Futuristic flourishes. The introduction of Princeton’s Arts and Transits project did just this, but the public was not on board with the transition completely.

The public’s response to Princeton University’s $330 million “Arts and Transit” project has been mixed since 2013. The project is aimed at expanding opportunities in the arts, improving the area’s aesthetics, and mitigating traffic. The project proposed moving a train terminal known as the “Dinky” and a Wawa adjacent to it. Continue reading

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Fleeting experience, lasting influence

Brian Rokus :: The Princeton Summer Journal

Brian Rokus :: The Princeton Summer Journal

By the Staff of the Princeton Summer Journal

Congratulations—and welcome to the Princeton University Summer Journalism Program.”

This was the first line in an email we all received in early May. The response was long awaited, but nothing could prepare us for the excitement looming ahead.

Our intellectual journey into the world of journalism started early. Azza, our program coordinator, bombarded us with an array of articles and probing questions in emails leading up to the week of the program. Our anticipation continued to grow.

When we first met, we began to put faces to names. Upon arrival, we conducted interviews with Princeton residents on their opinions of New Jersey Governor and GOP presidential candidate Chris Christie. The following days were a medley of workshops, guest speakers during meals, and getting to know our counselors and peers.

After learning the basics of journalism, we took to the field to use our skills. We wrote reviews of movies and campus plays; we covered a baseball game; we conducted an investigative report. On our trip to New York City, the first visit for many, we toured the offices of Bloomberg, TIME, The New York Times, and The Daily Beast. These experiences in writing were invaluable to us as students interested in journalism. Continue reading

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GOP must rethink strategy to overthrow Trump

Jocelyn Molina
Roma, Tex.

Illustration by Juliana Kim

Illustration by Juliana Kim

If the candidates vying for the Republican Party’s nomination succeeded at anything on the debate floor last Thursday, it was making our party look even more ridiculous — and further damaging our chances for the presidency.

When the top 10 Republican candidates met for the first GOP debate of the 2016 campaign season, a few — such as former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush, Republican and Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla. — succeeded in getting their points across and in generally seeming reasonable. Most of the others, however, accomplished just the opposite. And it wasn’t only Donald Trump.

It’s a given that Trump, with his polling numbers at an impressive 20 to 24 percent, is damaging to the Republican Party. But many other candidates were no better on Thursday. On the debate floor, Sen. Rand Paul, R-K.Y. utilized much of his speaking time to undermine Trump, saying that he “buys and sells politicians of all stripes.” He later engaged in a heated argument about the Patriot Act with New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie, and yet another with Trump concerning a “single-payer system” for healthcare. Both featured a great deal of yelling. Rather than undermining Trump, Paul only appeared as undesirable as the candidate he was trying to tarnish. Continue reading

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The case for cheerleading as a sport

Marsriana Datta
Memphis, Tenn.

Illustration by Samuel Lee

Illustration by Samuel Lee

In a recent interview I asked Jerry Price, the senior associate director of athletics and athletic communications at Princeton University, whether he considered cheerleading a sport. This will be my first year as a cheerleader at my high school in Memphis and I am curious about people’s opinions on cheerleading.

Price said that at Princeton, “The cheerleaders are a club, not a varsity sport,” referring to how the school classifies the team for funding. I had never met anyone who does not believe that cheerleading is a sport, but he’s not the only one. Many sports administrators don’t believe that cheerleading is a sport, which can be illustrated by a case in Hartford, Conn.

In 2012, Quinnipiac University made a case at a federal appeals court to consider cheerleading a sport. The court ruled that according to the components of a varsity sport under Title IX, cheerleading doesn’t meet the standards (yet). In the future, cheerleading could be recognized as a varsity sport if it is better organized and creates defined rules. For example, competitive cheerleading does not have a recruitment system or many other teams to compete against. Continue reading

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Girls’ dress choices do not invite disrespect

Jada Fitzpatrick
Queens, N.Y.

Illustration by Jeannie Regidor

Illustration by Jeannie Regidor

I’m proud of the girls who have respect enough not to dress inappropriately and to follow the dress code as the warm weather approaches.”

This is a statement that may sound familiar to many high school students. In fact, this is something my principal said recently.

I did not have an immediate reaction, but as I sat and thought about the words my principal had uttered, my blood began to boil. Respect? It was as if wearing shorts and revealing my belly button equated to a lack of self-respect.

What was even more horrifying was the fact that my guidance counselor said she agreed with my principal’s perspective. She implied that wearing a crop top or similar clothes attracts negative attention and girls who dress inappropriately contribute to the possibility of their rape. She’s a woman, by the way. Continue reading

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SAT and ACT stunt intellectual growth

Samuel Lee
Fullerton, Calif.

Throughout history, numbers have mystified and haunted humans. For example, Christians have revered the number seven as the “holy number,” and the number 666, associated with Satanism, is known as the “mark of the beast.” Today, however, humans strive toward the numbers 2400, 800, and 36.

SAT and ACT stunt intellectual growth

Illustration by Marsriana Datta

Whether students are striving for perfect scores on the SAT or the ACT, the obsession with standardized tests has held American higher education captive for nearly a century. Ultimately, this obsession stifles productivity and intellectual growth.

The SAT was first administered in 1926; the ACT followed several decades later, in 1959. Maybe 50 years ago, when American culture was more homogenous — when we all watched the same three channels and subscribed to the same few magazines — standardized tests were a smart way of determining college acceptances. But today, in an increasingly diverse and fast-paced culture, these decades-old tests are less effective at measuring a student’s capabilities. They instill in people a dogmatic mentality that high test scores equate to high success. With a greater emphasis on creative thinking and problem-solving skills — think Silicon Valley vs. General Motors — today’s society has a set of values that differ from the rote memorization of the past. Continue reading

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Violent protests demand understanding of context

Misbah Awan
Queens, N.Y.

Mainstream media is a dominant tool of white supremacy. Oftentimes, the media is far more respectful towards white serial killers and mass murderers than unarmed black folks. However, America gets an F when it comes to understanding black political strategy, let alone the value of black life. In the “white imagination,” violence is considered to be highly radical and terrifying.

The media, as we know it, perpetuates this false dichotomy between non-violent protests as being effective and noble and violent protests as being ineffective, immoral, and “bad.” However, violent protests are just as potent as non-violent protests because they help in giving a voice to individuals being misrepresented in mainstream media or underrepresented at large. Continue reading

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Trump’s immigration stance based on racist ideology

Cinthia Leon
Albuquerque, N.M.

It is clear that the comments made by Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump about undocumented Mexican immigrants were absolutely racist. What seems unclear is Trump’s lack of understanding on why those comments were offensive — not only to Mexicans and Mexican-Americans, but also to all Latinos. 

Trump announced his candidacy on June 16. That same day, he made his racist remarks, characterizing Mexican immigrants as “drug dealers, rapists, and criminals.” He did not provide any evidence, and he probably didn’t anticipate the consequences of his actions. NBC, Univision, Macy’s and many others proceeded to cut off all ties with him. Continue reading

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Trump will win the GOP nomination

Rave’n DaJon Coleman
Philadelphia, Pa.

After the first Republican presidential debate on Aug. 6, Donald Trump is still the talk of the nation. He didn’t sink or rise. Trump was his usual self onstage: controversial, somewhat serious, and hilarious. When Fox News anchor Megyn Kelly questioned Trump about his past comments describing women as “fat pigs, dogs, slobs, and disgusting animals,” he interrupted her by saying, “Only Rosie O’Donnell.” The crowd loved it.

Going into the debate I believed that Trump was a legitimate candidate. Now I have a bolder statement to make: Trump will win the Republican presidential nomination. Continue reading

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Cubans in Miami torn on eased U.S. relations

Jeannie Regidor
Miami, Fla.

Cuba’s troubled relationship with the United States has been playing out like a bad movie for a long time. It’s been 55 years since 1960, the year America placed a trade embargo on the island, and 56 years since 1961, the year all diplomatic relations ended. Now the plot of the movie has taken a dramatic turn, with President Obama’s July 1 announcement that the U.S. and Cuba are restoring relations with each other. In the wake of the announcement, the Cuban immigrant community in Miami is torn about whether to celebrate — and with good reason, because there are strong arguments on both sides.

Miami’s Cuban community is made up largely of those who have fled the Castro regime over the decades. The regime left many people in poverty, except the very elite, and imprisoned anyone who opposed it. Continue reading

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With one candidate, Democrats are doomed

Adrian Meneses
Compton, Calif.

Perhaps the worst crime that any political party can commit is to have just one viable candidate.

Take the Democratic Party of 2015, for example. With Hillary Clinton the only plausible contender for the nomination, Democrats have yet to prepare for their doomsday scenario: What if something happens to Clinton? Who would replace her in the race?

Clinton’s fellow Democratic candidates simply lack her political expertise and experience. From the current field, Bernie Sanders — currently in second place in national polls with 20 percent — would be Clinton’s most adequate replacement. But he is fundamentally unelectable because of his extreme left-wing positions, and the stigma of being a socialist. Continue reading

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Rename schools named after racist leaders

Doris Rodriguez
Miami, Fla.

We are in the midst of a fight for civil rights. The abrupt killings of Trayvon Martin, Eric Garner, and other unarmed black men have caused mass outrage. This summer, a massacre at a historic black church in Charleston made it clear that there is still much progress to be made. A Confederate flag flying near South Carolina’s capitol also highlighted that despite many advancements, symbols of racism have become ingrained in our everyday lives.

In July, protesters forced South Carolina to remove the flag. But many other streets, libraries, and even our currency, undeservedly honor historical figures that implemented racist policies. If we want to progress as a nation, we shouldn’t stop at removing the Confederate flag — we should reconsider the names of our schools. Continue reading

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Donald Trump misunderstands immigrants’ motivations

Christina Gaspar
Oceanside, Calif.

Donald Trump started his surprisingly successful presidential campaign by pointing a finger at Mexico. “When Mexico sends its people, they’re not sending their best,” he said. “They’re bringing drugs, they’re bringing crime. They’re rapists and some, I assume, are good people,” Trump argues that building a wall, paid by Mexico, would stop the influx of immigrants.

Mexican immigrants moved in large numbers toward the United States in the 19th and 20th centuries. Of course, Mexican immigrants still continue to migrate, but now in smaller numbers. In the past few years most immigrants crossing the U.S. border with Mexico have been from other Central American countries. Continue reading

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Play fails to live up to the myth

By Jasmin Lee
Oakland Gardens, N.Y.

When Orpheus looked back, Eurydice disappeared — so did the audience.

Directed by Wesley Cornwell and written by award-winning playwright Sarah Ruhl, Eurydice retells the myth of Orpheus and his wife in a modernized setting from Eurydice’s perspective.

The play was not memorable. The production did have some clever aspects and notable scenes supported by a strong cast. However, the modernization didn’t capture the essence of the original. The humor didn’t correlate with the narrative and some of the concepts were too abstract. Continue reading

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‘Eurydice’ confounds, entices audiences

By Sharon Bayantemur
Brooklyn, N.Y.

Whether it’s a creative use of string to serve as a makeshift wedding ring or unnatural sounding dialogue at the beginning of the play, “Eurydice” has its ups and downs. Its theme of ambiguity is established early in the play when Orpheus describes a song he wrote as “interesting or not interesting. It just is.”

The Princeton Summer Theatre’s production, written by Sarah Ruhl, is running from Aug. 6-16 at the Hamilton Murray Theater. It’s a modern take on an ancient Greek myth in which a half-mortal, Orpheus, enters the underworld to save the woman he loves. This version was centered on Eurydice instead of Orpheus and how he is able to charm people around him with his music. Continue reading

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Rihanna challenges white feminism in controversial new video

By Misbah Awan
Queens, N.Y.

I am not an avid viewer of celebrity videos, partially because they don’t interest me but mostly because I know if I were to invest in watching them, I would feel as if my brain cells were slowly dying because of how these stars are represented.

Rihanna is different. She co-directed her most recently released video, “Bitch Better Have My Money.” While some white, female critics demonstrated discomfort with Rihanna’s video, I was not shocked by what I saw. I was amused. Continue reading

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McKellen makes ‘Holmes’ worth watching

By Katherine Powell
Chicago, Ill.

In Bill Condon’s Mr. Holmes, Ian McKellen plays Sherlock Holmes, the famous fictitious detective. Holmes has retired to the countryside, to tend to bees and try to remember his last case, which led him to retire from his detective work. Holmes knows that the popular novel written by Watson has incorrectly made him the hero, but he has lost the threads of his memory. He lives in his home with a housekeeper, the widowed Mrs. Munro (Laura Linney) and her son Roger. Holmes is his typical gruff self, untangling the facts and investigating his own memory, while he grapples with his failing mind and feelings of loneliness.

One theme of the film is how much people need other people. Holmes spends his time trying to reconstruct the facts of his final investigation. He discovers that his fundamental mistake was not offering comfort to the woman, just cold facts. He realizes that logic is not the only thing that matters, and he becomes close to his housekeeper and her son, establishing a very sweet connection with the two. Continue reading

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McKellen can’t save disappointing ‘Holmes’

By Jasmin Lee
Oakland Gardens, N.Y.

When you hear the name Sherlock Holmes, an image of a lanky man wearing a deerstalker and smoking a pipe in the shadows of a dark alleyway comes to mind. Mr. Holmes, directed by Bill Condon and based on Mitch Cullin’s novel, “A Slight Trick of the Mind,” offers a very different Holmes.

The film features an elderly Holmes (Ian McKellen) residing in a Sussex village with a widowed housekeeper Mrs. Munro (Laura Linney) and her 14-year-old son Roger (Milo Parker). Set in 1947, the film centers on a tormented Holmes, who is haunted by fading memories of a 30-year-old case that caused him to go into retirement. Continue reading

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In prison, profs find their most eager students

By Juliana Kim
Queens, N.Y.

When Gillian Knapp first walked into the Garden State Youth Correctional Facility, she remembers the doors clanging shut behind her and the smell that lingered in the hallways. It was an odor familiar only to those who’ve ever been to a prison. As she walked through security, she didn’t know what to expect.

But Knapp wasn’t heading for a cell. Instead, she was going to a classroom.

Knapp, a retired astrophysics professor, now leads the Prison Teaching Initiative (PTI). After more than 25 years teaching at Princeton University, she decided she needed a change. With four other astrophysicists, she decided to take on the prison education crisis in the United States. Continue reading

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Princeton astrophysicist defies stereotypes

By Doris Rodriguez
Miami, Fla.

If there’s one thing Jenny Greene knew when she entered college it was that she did not want to be a scientist.

When Greene started at Yale she immersed herself in the humanities, but come March she was utterly bored. After taking an astronomy course, she was hooked. She realized that the philosophical questions of the world just weren’t for her. Nineteen years later, she is an assistant professor of astrophysics at Princeton University. Here, she studies “supermassive black holes and the universe they live in.” Continue reading

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Mayor Lempert draws on roots as community organizer

By Kaleb Anderson
Atlanta, Ga.

The small town of Princeton prides itself on continuing education and maintaining a safe community. Liz Lempert, mayor of Princeton, oversees a $6 million municipal budget and is committing herself to work toward a better and more diverse community.

Lempert grew up in San Mateo, Calif. Her parents are natives of New York state. She attended Stanford University and became a journalist in the Stanford, Calif. area. Lempert married, had two children, and moved to Princeton when her husband became a psychology professor at the university in 1999. Continue reading

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Despite lead in polls, Trump garners skepticism on N.Y. streets

By ShiWanda Sheard-Perry
West Helena, Ark.

NEW YORK — Donald Trump is a shocking subject. In interviews with the Princeton Summer Journal, people on the street in New York responded with everything from gasps to looks and sounds of disgust and disapproval.  These everyday New Yorkers were all from different places and backgrounds, but they all had one thing in common — they are not for Donald Trump.

New Yorkers either had a mouthful to say or made no comment at all about the leading Republican candidate. The biggest challenge was finding someone who would actually speak on the subject. But when they did they gave some very interesting responses. Continue reading

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On N.Y. streets, Trump’s candidacy wins smiles, skepticism

By Kamila Czachorowski
Norridge, Ill.

NEW YORK — Donald Trump is against political correctness, has said the Mexican government is sending criminals and rapists to the United States, and lacks experience as an elected official. On Aug. 6, the day of the first Republican debate, 13 people on the High Line in New York answered questions about Trump. Given Trump’s reputation, their initial reactions were either a laugh or smile.

There was much discussion about why the businessman is at the top of the polls and whether he can even be considered a legitimate candidate. Four of the 13 people interviewed believed that Trump’s popularity is due to his charisma, candor and connections — qualities reflective of his background in the entertainment industry. Continue reading

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Zwicker promises evidence-based policy

By Samuel Lee
Fullerton, Calif.

Princeton University plasma physicist and professor Andrew Zwicker unravels complex political issues with what he knows best: science. As the New Jersey General Assembly election in November quickly approaches, Zwicker said the scientific method will play a role in his campaign to represent the 16th District.

“I will promise to use evidence to make decisions because that’s what I do as a scientist,” the Democratic candidate said. The General Assembly is the lower house of New Jersey’s bicameral legislative body, and elections are held each odd-numbered year. If elected on Nov. 3, Zwicker could enact state laws and propose amendments to the state’s constitution. Continue reading

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Physicist launches bid for assembly

By Katherine Powell
Chicago, Ill.

Andrew Zwicker wants to change the way people think about politicians.

“I want to use evidence to make decisions,” he said at a press conference on Aug. 1. “Facts cannot have a political position. The facts are the facts.”

Zwicker, a plasma physicist and bioethics professor at Princeton University, is running as a Democrat for one of two positions as general assemblyman of the 16th district, which includes the town of Princeton.

The theme of Zwicker’s proposed policies is basing decisions on facts and science, instead of party politics and rhetoric. He believes that scientists are valuable in politics because they are familiar with tedious research and used to making fact-based decisions.

Wearing khaki pants, an aqua polo and an easy smile while speaking to the Princeton Summer Journalism Program, Zwicker talked about Gov. Chris Christie, education, and how he intends to bring science to politics.

Zwicker criticized the lack of local leadership from Christie, who is a Republican presidential candidate. Zwicker said Christie’s decisions are grounded in his desire to impress a national audience, and that he has disregarded the needs of New Jersey.

“I have a real problem with this governor,” Zwicker said. “He is running a presidential campaign. It seems that he has abandoned New Jersey.”

He criticized Christie’s decision to pull out of the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative, a coalition of states in the Northeast and mid-Atlantic that aims to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Zwicker believes participating in the alliance could have brought money into the state. As an assemblyman, Zwicker promises to use statistics and scientific studies to decide the best course of action.

Zwicker also said he was an advocate of marijuana legalization. “There should be no debate about studying medicinal marijuana,” he said. Zwicker also confirmed that he had smoked marijuana, before quickly backtracking that it was something he did when he was young. 

In addition, Zwicker wants to remedy what he calls the inequality of New Jersey’s school systems. He believes good teachers are discouraged by high-stakes standardized testing, where they are evaluated on how their students do.

Zwicker’s introduction to politics began when he was a child growing up in Englewood, N.J. His mother, a retired English teacher, sparked his interest in politics. Her passion for political issues piqued his curiosity.

“The arguments I remember helped me get interested in politics,” Zwicker said.

Later, working in the plasma physics lab at Princeton, Zwicker saw an older scientist and colleague, former U.S. Congressman Rush Holt (D.-N.J.), enter the political arena. He said that Holt was a major inspiration to him. Zwicker realized that there was a role for scientists in government, and he believes that he will help the people of the 16th district by evaluating the facts and making informed decisions from there.

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Zwicker makes second bid for office

By Marsriana Datta
Memphis, Tenn.

For Andrew Zwicker, a Democrat running for the New Jersey General Assembly in the 16th District, science as well as politics can help to solve the state’s problems.

“The one thing I promise to do is use evidence to make decisions,” Zwicker said at a press conference with the Princeton Summer Journal on Aug. 1.

Zwicker, who is a physicist at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, is focusing on protecting the environment and ensuring better job prospects for college graduates. Continue reading

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Princeton physicist seeks public office

By Cinthia Leon
Albuquerque, N.M.

Andrew Zwicker wants to change politics. His prescription for change, however, is not the typical one.

“I want to use evidence to make decisions,” he said at a press conference Aug. 1, discussing his candidacy for New Jersey assemblyman for the 16th District. “I come from a different background and I have a different approach.”

Zwicker’s focus on evidence is not surprising. For the last 18 years, Zwicker has been a plasma physicist — focusing on fusion energy research — at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. Although he’s a scientist, Zwicker has always had passion for politics. Continue reading

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PUPP aims to improve college access

By Jeannie Regidor
Miami, Fl.

Programs like the Princeton University Preparatory Program (PUPP) — a college preparatory program for low-income high school students in the Princeton and Trenton areas — are few and far between. But when low-income students find them, they are like diamonds in the rough. Over 80 percent of top-performing low-income students don’t apply to highly selective universities, according to Questbridge.

“Some people are breezing by and unconcerned about paying for college, and others have lost hope of going to college,” said Renata Stankowska, a 16-year-old rising junior at Ewing High School and a student at PUPP this summer. Continue reading

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Program readies young ‘PUPPs’ for college

By Jada Fitzpatrick
Queens, N.Y.

To be a high achieving low-income student isn’t easy. Imagine being trapped in perpetual limbo between knowing what you’re capable of and not knowing how to cultivate your intellect. Reflect upon the sad predicament of not having regular access to test prep programs, college visits, or other vital aspects of the application process because your family is financially disadvantaged.

This was the reality for Janina Calle, a student at Trenton Central High School West. She is a great student, but like many students from low-income households in schools with limited resources, Janina also faces the challenge of not being able to take advantage of educational opportunities and resources. However, the founding of the Princeton University Preparatory Program (PUPP) has helped to turn around the lives of Janina and other students like her. Continue reading

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In Princeton, Christie’s bid falls flat

By Trista Merrival
Pine Ridge, S.D.

Voters in Princeton say Chris Christie doesn’t make the mark in the 2016 presidential race. People interviewed by the Princeton Summer Journal on July 31 said the Governor is not cooperative and doesn’t have the profile to get the Republican nomination.

Christie’s poll numbers have recently dropped in his home state, in part due to the increase in time he has spent on the campaign trail in pursuit of the 2016 Republican nomination. However, voters still like that he expanded Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act in New Jersey.

Ricardo Dummodie, a 24-year-old graduate student who has lived in New Jersey for two years, said that “Chris Christie is not much of a statesman.” Continue reading

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Princeton residents question Christie’s presidential bid

By ShiWanda Sheard-Perry
West Helena, Ark.

New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie has been down in the polls for the Republican presidential nomination. A recent poll conducted by Monmouth University showed he only had the support of 4.4 percent of Republican voters, trailing fellow GOP candidates Donald Trump (26%), Jeb Bush (12.2%), Scott Walker (11.1%), Ted Cruz (5.8%), Mike Huckabee (5.7%) and Ben Carson (4.6%).

Even in his home state, he doesn’t seem to have a firm group of supporters. After conducting four interviews with New Jersey residents for the Princeton Summer Journal, Christie seemed to be hated. Continue reading

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Women athletes still discriminated against despite recent successes

By Rave’n DaJon Coleman
Philadelphia, Pa.

This July, Jen Welter became a coach for the Arizona Cardinals. She is the first woman in NFL history to become a female coach. The sports world greeted her hiring as a moment of great progress for women in sports. “I want little girls to grow up knowing that when they put their mind to something, when they work hard, that they can do anything regardless,” Welter told the New York Times. Continue reading

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Utley proves fan favorite during Trenton rehab

By Kaleb Anderson
Atlanta, G.A.

TRENTON — Fans adore him. His teammates need him. People travel to see him. The team would be nothing without him. Who is this superstar? Two words: Chase Utley. Utley is a widely popular, professional baseball player who is irresistibly talented and has a large fan base. He currently plays for the Philadelphia Phillies, but because of his recent ankle injury he has played for the Double-A baseball team, the Reading Fightin’ Phils. Utley represents the archetype for athletes who will always have support from their fans regardless of their performance in games. Continue reading

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For Utley, rehab draws crowds

By Sharon Bayantemur
Brooklyn, N.Y.

TRENTON — The smell of fried food in the muggy air mingled with the crowd’s boisterousness at Arm & Hammer Park in Trenton, N.J. Everyone was waiting for the Trenton Thunder to go head-to-head with the Reading Fightin’ Phils. The $15-million major leaguer Chase Utley, a star Philadelphia Phillies infielder, was in the lineup while recuperating from a recent ankle injury. He was the main motivation for most Phillies fans to come to the Aug. 4 Double-A game. Continue reading

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Price speaks for Princeton

By Trista Merrival
Pine Ridge, S.D.

Jerry Price, 52, is in many ways the public face of Princeton sports. He’s responsible for the publication and promotion of the university’s athletic program—a job that calls for him to tell positive stories about Tiger athletics.

“If you’re relying on media to come cover your team, what are they going to say? ‘They lost again; they can’t score a goal,’” Price said. By contrast, in telling the stories himself, he can put forward an upbeat narrative about Princeton athletics. Continue reading

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Princeton’s Price is not the typical public relations man

By Addie Morton
Knoxville, Tenn.

Jerry Price’s desk is unkempt, cluttered with files, and his walls are covered in family photos. He leans back in his chair with a casual demeanor and rests his feet on the bottom drawer of his desk.

“I’d like to write a book about something at some point,” he muses, sitting in his Jadwin Gymnasium office.

If the book is an extension of his blog, “TigerBlog,” expect a candid conversation, voiced in the third person. Continue reading

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Ups and downs of Princeton sports with Jerry Price

By Christina Gaspar
Oceanside, Calif.

Jerry Price, who currently serves as Princeton’s Senior Associate Director of Athletics and Athletic Communications, used to view Princeton sports from the outside, covering the school’s teams for both The Trenton Times and The Princeton Packet. A graduate of University of Pennsylvania, he was hired by Princeton in 1994 and became the voice of Princeton’s sports teams. Continue reading

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Trenton Thunder fade against Fightin’ Phils, 7-1

By Marlee Kelly
Pine Ridge, S.D.

TRENTON — The sun set over Arm & Hammer Park as fans anticipated the first pitch of the game. The Trenton Thunder and the Reading Fightin’ Phils were competing for second place in the Eastern League.

For the most part, it was a typical baseball game: the fans went quiet as a tribute to local veterans played on the big screen, and a young local, Victoria Paul, sang the national anthem. But on Aug. 5, the crowd was here to see something unusual. Continue reading

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Fightin’ Phils silence Trenton Thunder, 7-1

By Kamila Czachorowski
Norridge, Ill.

TRENTON — On Aug. 5, the Trenton Thunder lost 7-1 to the Reading Fightin Phils. Judging by the cheers and clapping, the majority of the crowd was supporting -Philadelphia Phillies second baseman Chase Utley, who was temporarily playing for the Reading Fightin’ Phils. Utley suffered an ankle injury in June and has begun the process of working back up to the major leagues. Continue reading

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Facts of Gaza conflict elude many in New York

A demonstrator displays a flag at a gathering for Universal Peace Day, which commemorates the bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, on Aug. 5.

A demonstrator displays a flag at a gathering for Universal Peace Day, which commemorates the bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, on Aug. 5.

By Angela Kim, Amna Nawaz, Nicholas Santiago and Hasani Valdez
with the staff of the Princeton Summer Journal

ByTheNumbersNew Yorkers are known for their global-mindedness, diversity and strong opinions. But in a survey conducted by the Princeton Summer Journalism Program last week in New York, a majority of respondents did not know some of the basic facts of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict in Gaza.

A large majority of 410 people interviewed around Union Square on Aug. 5 did not know the name of the leader of Hamas, the political faction which governs Gaza and is regarded as a terrorist group by the United States. Although 58-year-old Khaled Meshaal has run Hamas for the past ten years, 99 percent of those surveyed could not name him. Just three percent of those interviewed were aware that the Hamas leader resides in exile in Qatar.

Of those interviewed, just under 25 percent correctly identified the approximate number of Israeli casualties, which numbered 67 as of Aug. 6, according to BBC world news. (Responses within the range of 47-87 were considered correct answers.) Similarly, just under 25 percent of those polled correctly identified the number of Palestinian casualties within a range of 1300-2300. The number was 1,888 on Aug. 4, according to the Palestinian Center for Human Rights. Continue reading

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Proposed pipeline through Princeton draws scrutiny

By Rashid Binnur, Catherina Gioino and Nelly Mendoza

In recent years, awareness of the environmental hazards posed by pipeline projects has grown, driven in part by the possible construction of the controversial Keystone XL pipeline, which would run from Canada to the Gulf of Mexico.

Now there is debate over a proposed pipeline that would pass through Princeton — a 1.3-mile stretch of the partly constructed 10,200-mile Transco pipeline, which would carry natural gas from Texas to New York.

New Jersey Senators Cory Booker and Robert Menendez, along with U.S. Representatives Rush Holt and Frank Pallone, called for an extensive review of the project’s environmental impact last month. A week earlier, Princeton’s town council had passed a resolution asking the federal government to reject the current pipeline plan. Between concerns over environmental damage and human safety, the project has some residents wondering: Is this pipeline a good deal for Princeton? Continue reading

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Daring to dream of a brighter future

studentsatthetimes-FullColor-2By the Staff of The Princeton Summer Journal

Ten days ago, we arrived at Princeton University for the start of the Summer Journalism Program. We came from all over the country with different backgrounds and cultures, but we shared a common interest in journalism.

Today, we leave Princeton as friends and as members of the broader SJP family. We have had a once-in-a-lifetime experience and formed long-lasting friendships cemented through long days of workshops and late nights in the newsroom. Continue reading