Author Archives: pusjp

New York’s broken subway system: 39 student reporters’ moment-by-moment account of travails and complaints during a single rush hour

By Princeton Summer Journal staff

As the summer of 2017 comes to an end, the long-simmering problems with the New York City subway system have reached full boil. The congestion caused by nearly 6 million riders a day has dramatically slowed down the rail system. The 112-year-old signaling system is unable to withstand everyday use. Rail cars built more than 50 years ago are breaking down more frequently than ever before. Two high-profile derailments – including one that injured 34 people and an incident in which people were trapped underground – have New Yorkers demanding changes from their elected officials.

On Tuesday, August 8, during rush hour, 39 reporters from the Princeton Summer Journal spread out to dozens of subway stations across the city, interviewing riders about how the crisis is affecting them. While some people told us that their experiences with the subway system have been positive, many other riders had major frustrations, which we relay below.

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Campus conservatives navigate post-Trump republicanism

By Valeria Escobar
Dallas, TX

With camo cargo shorts and a blue crew-neck shirt commemorating the Battle of Gettysburg, Matthew Penza, a rising junior at Princeton, stood in front of the classroom in a power stance. He first seriously contemplated conservative ideology when he studied great thinkers of the Enlightenment such John Locke, Voltaire, and Montesquieu. But Penza would later dismiss their arguments from his political philosophy. “I am a monarchist,” he told the Princeton Summer Journal. “I am an uppercase ‘R’ Republican. I do not believe in the idea of a republic.”

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Staff editorial: Embracing diversity, in journalism and beyond

By Princeton Summer Journal staff

Journalism in general is a struggling enterprise, one which can unfortunately deter plenty of hopefuls. Historically popular media outlets have seen a steep decline in their finances, and many American public schools do not provide students with a course in journalism or media. The declining popularity of traditional journalism among the millennial generation may spell doom for the industry. However, there is potential for aspiring young writers.

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Opinion: Don’t use white women to sell black hair products

By Jessica Simpson
Chicago, IL

From the time an African American girl is born, she’s told that she must aspire to have “good hair.” She is told that her hair is nappy and should be relaxed because it’s too difficult to style naturally. Years of relaxing hair developed the notion that black hair is “bad” and not as beautiful as it’s other counterparts. The hatred of natural black hair lasted for years, until recently.

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Administrators, students respond to Trump immigration policy

By Danielle Emerson
Shiprock, NM

On a Friday afternoon, Albert Rivera took the train home from work. His eyes were on his phone the entire time. The message would have been lost in his email if he had not glanced at it that morning. A member of Princeton University faced legal complications at the airport. Rivera was busy texting an attorney. This was right after President Trump announced the travel ban.

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A non-football fan reports from the press box

By Muhammad Elarbi
San Diego, CA

It was the opening weekend of the 2017 NFL preseason, and I found myself in the MetLife Stadium press box to cover the New York Jets and Tennessee Titans. One would assume that someone who has a seat in the press box would be knowledgeable about what is going on. But this time, that wasn’t the case.

Saturday marked my first time at a football game. Before I entered the stadium, I didn’t even know which state the teams called home. I was clueless.

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Opinion: The scourge of environmental racism

By Yamilet Velez
Los Angeles, CA

In the low-income neighborhoods that surround the worst factories in the United States, smoke fills workers’ lungs, clogs the environment, and paints the skies grey. As dystopian as that sounds, harsh factory conditions are a reality in many communities of color.

My own parents moved into East Los Angeles, near the Tesoro Oil Refinery, not because it had the cleanest air, but simply because they couldn’t afford homes in the “rich areas” of Los Angeles, California. That was their only option, and unbeknownst to them, it was a dangerous one.

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